Angel Wings & Other Aspirations: The Art of Dimithry Victor

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Self Expression. charcoal, 9×12,” 2015

 

Dimithry Victor, a self-taught 16-year-old artist from Fort Lauderdale, Florida, admits to having “many aspirations and goals, the most important ones to make people think and change the world through art.” No small ambition.

“I know art can be used to express emotion, and get people to pay attention to a certain topic or even make them feel emotions. That is what I plan to do with my art.”

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I Can Fly, pen and ink, 9×12,” 2015

Dimithry’s interest in art came by way of comics and cartoons. “When I was a kid I used to copy and learn from comic book artists like Jim Lee and Nate Van Dyke. I started drawing to pass the time while I was in church because I didn’t understand what was being discussed,” he says. “Later I made art at home and it eventually became something I really liked doing.

“As I got older and learned about other artists, I tried being more original while still trying to learn from artists I now admire like Andy Warhol, David Choe, Picasso, Jean Michel Basquiat and Michelangelo.”

Dimithry enjoys experimenting with different styles and mediums—from photography and collage to pencil and watercolor. He often uses charcoal and ink for his sketches. “I choose black and white when I want a drawing to look more intense. Recently I have been experimenting with colors and ways I can show emotion through colors.”

 

Messing_with_Charcoal
Messing with Charcoal, charcoal, 9×12,” 2015

 

 

A junior at South Plantation High School, Dimithry’s recent art reflects his interest in “adult topics” including religion, fashion, “the glamour of everyday life” and Expressionist painters like Basquiat. His drawing, Messing With Charcoal, features the face of a favorite model, Natalie Weaves, paired with a paparazzi intruder, “The hand of God” moniker, and the inspiration of Michelangelo: “The true work of art is but a shadow of the divine perfection.”

 

 

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Natalie Weaves, charcoal and pencil, 9×12,” 2015

 

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Child Watercolor Portrait, 9×12,” 2016

 

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Frustration, pen, 8×10,” 2016

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“I’m very interested in people’s behavior, the ideals that shape our society and how we live. Most of what I make is a commentary on these ideas.”

Dimithry also explores themes of human frailty and yearning for perfection in his Modern Day Bible series depicting figures with angel wings. “It’s about how people adore or idolize pop culture like they would a religion. In my series, anyone can become an angel, or reach heaven by getting their ‘wings’, which represent fame.

“These drawings are meant to be regular people who are imperfect attempting to become perfect like angels. The angels are trying to reach the pureness and perfection of good angels. The angels represent the fallen hopes of people who try so hard to reach a standard of perfection in life.

 

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Angel Wings, charcoal, 9×12,” 2016

 

“I think that’s what people try to be, when in fact, it’s impossible to achieve. In Angel Wings, the smudges on the figure represent imperfections.

Unfinished
Unfinished Angel, charcoal and pencil, 9×12,” 2015

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fashion_Angel
Fashion Angel, charcoal, 9×12,” 2015

 

 

 

 

“In Fashion Angel, I pursue the idea of perfection with models and fashion. Models are meant to look perfect and pure, but in reality, they can be very self conscious so I made the woman look unsure, and kind of embarrassed.”

 

 

 

 

 

Where Are My Arms-3
Where Are My Arms, digital, 4.50×8.00,” 2016

 

Dimithry dedicated his digital work, Where are My Arms, to Michelangelo. “He says all his work was to impress God and he was only doing the work God wanted him to. The figure’s halo and red heart symbolize the spirit of God. The arms are flying around because they are trying to do ‘multiple things’ just like Michelangelo who used his hands in painting, architecture and sculpture.”

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Victor with wings

 

 

An aspiring multi-talent himself, Dimithry’s work has been featured in Sediment Literary Arts Journal, The Literary Nest, Celebrating Art as well as the cover story of After the Pause, winter 2015. His drawings were included in W.I.L.D Exhibition in Orange County, California in 2015. Click on Dimithry’s website to see more.

 

 

 

 

 

 

—Elizabeth Meade Howard, Art Editor

cover image: Kayla, pencil drawing, 9×12,” 2016

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