Category Archives: Essay/Memoir

Chairs by Andy Bockhold

Non-Fiction
 

Andy’s first canoe trip down the Little Miami River was the same day his mother was set to come home from the hospital after a major bowel resection. A week earlier surgeons had opened her up from navel to groin to remove necrotic portions of her lower intestines that had shriveled up like rotten calamari and blocked her from passing anything thicker than water. Once they were finished inside, they cinched her open wounds together and stapled them shut. She now had a train track-like incision complete with railroad ties running down her stretched pink … Continue reading Chairs by Andy Bockhold

Why People Love Woody Allen by Joe Arton

Non-Fiction
 

In November of 2011, PBS aired the latest addition in their American Masters series; Woody Allen: A Documentary. Robert Weide’s celebrity profile of Allen was a thorough and nuanced examination of his life and work. Aside from Weide’s unprecedented access to the pathologically private star, the documentary’s combination of star study, textual analysis and cultural context makes it one of the most important works on Allen and a triumph of the celebrity documentary form. However, in the film’s almost two hour running time, divided over two consecutive nights, it failed to answer a central question … Continue reading Why People Love Woody Allen by Joe Arton

Blue Coat by Dania Rajendra

Non-Fiction
 

The blue coat is slung over my arm, and I consider it against the long row of our walk-in closet. I do own four other coats, but this one was a gift from my once-closest friend Cue. I contemplate whether, at the landmark age of twenty-nine, I am now too old to wear fake blue fur. I hope not. I loved this coat so much that a few years ago, I paid a tailor at my neighborhood dry cleaning joint fifty bucks to reline it. Fifty bucks and he used the cheapest of polyester and … Continue reading Blue Coat by Dania Rajendra

Jemima Wilkinson, Elusive Messiah by Robert Boucheron

Non-Fiction
 

Jemima Wilkinson (1752-1819) was born in Cumberland, Rhode Island of Quaker parents, the eighth of twelve children. When she was about twelve years old, her mother died after giving birth. These facts might go far to explain Wilkinson’s career as a revivalist preacher, advocate of celibacy, leader of a millennial sect, and founder of a utopian community. Or they might not. Called the first American-born woman to found a religious group, Wilkinson is a rare figure in the history of faith, and one of the most elusive. Starting two years after her death, Wilkinson has … Continue reading Jemima Wilkinson, Elusive Messiah by Robert Boucheron